Backyard Gnome takes a look at Connemara

the-backyard-gnome-logoWe love it when someone talks about Connemara and our mission.

The latest comes from The Backyard Gnome, where writer Tony McLellan takes a thoughtful look at our history as well as the work we are doing today.

[Read more…]

Join our Adopt An Acre campaign to protect North Texas open space

As development continues to accelerate, open space plays a more important role in protection of our water supply.

At this time of giving, it is important to remember that one of the most important gifts we can leave for future generations is access to the beauty and wonders of nature. That’s why we hope that when you are making your end of year gifts you will include the Connemara Conservancy in your plans.

There is no doubt that the dramatic growth of North Texas over the past decade has put tremendous strain on our land and our natural resources. That’s why we are working hard with landowners, local governments and forward thinking developers to identify and protect open space throughout the area that will be important to ensuring that we are able to maintain our quality of life.

But there’s so much more to our land – and our work  – than just the acres on the ground, the sunsets, the hunting trips, the summers spent at the lakes and the wild places where imaginations can still roam free.

Conserving land provides many critical, long-lasting benefits. Protecting sensitive wetlands and the lands surrounding lakes, rivers and streams from development protects floodplains and keeps polluted runoff out of drinking water. Preventing more land from being covered in concrete ensures that more of the precious little water that falls has the ability to soak into the ground and our aquifers, replenishing our water supply and reducing the chance of serious flooding.

The need for conservation is growing

Connemara currently protects more than 6,000 acres of open space. In addition, we provide access to conservation education for thousands of students each year.

But our work is far from done. The demand for our services has never been greater.

That’s why we need your help.

Connemara relies on the generosity of people like you that believe in the importance of open space and conservation education.

Preserving our heritage

We invite you to read this year’s letter from Amy Williams Monier, who founded Connemara with her mother, Frances Williams, in the early 1980s.

Letter from co-founder Amy Monier Williams.

At the time, even though their farmland was surrounded by tens of thousands of acres of open space, they knew development was one its way and it was only a matter of time before their land would be surrounded by homes and shopping centers.

That day has arrived.

By establishing the Connemara Conservancy and setting aside 72 acres of their most pristine property as the Meadow Nature Preserve to be protected and enjoyed forever, however, they made sure that every generation to come would have access to the beautiful landscape that generations of their family had enjoyed.

Now we ask you to help us continue the important work by Amy and her mother over three decades ago by visiting our contribution page and making a gift to Connemara. As Frances was fond of saying: “Remember that even the most modest gift gives grace to the giver.”

Best wishes for a Happy Holiday season and a wonderful New Year.

Connemara Conservancy Board of Trustees.
Mark Yarbrough, president
Beverly Coghlan, vice president
Sherry Englande Brown, treasurer
Bob Mione, Meadow Steering Committee chair
Ross Obermeyer
Dr. Eileen Tollett
Jim Watkins
Scott White, secretary

Click Here To Make Your Gift To Connemara

 

An early Christmas present! Congress makes tax incentives for donated conservation easements PERMANENT!

The beauty of the Rockin’ K Ranch on full display.

In a strong bipartisan action, the Senate and House voted late last week on a broad, year-end tax deal that will make the enhanced tax incentive for donations of conservation easements permanent! [Read more…]

A perfect day for Madness in the Meadow

MeadowLead600Despite the early morning showers, Saturday turned out to be a perfect day for our first Maze Madness in the Meadow. THANK YOU! to everyone that joined us and we hope to see you back on a regular basis. [Read more…]

Connemara adds three new board members, elects officers

The Connemara Conservancy board of directors will have three new members for the 2015-2016 fiscal year. We welcome Connemara founder Amy Monier, Sherry Englande Brown and Bob Mione to the board. [Read more…]

Extend your Earth Day celebration with a special Hops For Habitat

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Connemara is giving you a chance to extend your Earth Day celebration an extra day with a special family-friendly Hops For Habitat fundraiser on April 23 at Experimental Table in Lucas.

iStock_000018879725SmallThe event begins at 6:30 p.m. and will feature local chefs George Brown (Experimental Table), Matt Hamilton (Local Yocal Farm To Market) and Robert Lyford (Patina Green Home And Market). They will unleash their creative talents on pounds of smoked pork, charcuterie with house made pickles, fresh farm eggs and cool vegetables. All capped off by pastry chef Katie Brown’s homemade smore’s.

There will also be a special menu for the kids.

Tickets are $75 per adult and $10 per child and the event is sponsored by Experimental Table and Nine Band Brewing Co. with proceeds benefitting Connemara Conservancy.

Click Here to reserve your seat at the table.

 

Connemara to protect 550 acres of the Rockin’ K Ranch in Navarro County

The beauty of the Rockin’ K Ranch on full display.

The beauty of the Rockin’ K Ranch on full display.

We are excited to announce that Connemara will provide protection for 550 acres of the Rockin’ K Ranch in Corsicana thanks to a recently signed conservation easement.

The easement will protect a portion of a large family cattle ranch in perpetuity. The land within the easement will also serve as a mitigation bank, protecting the flood plain of the Chambers Creek, which has been determined to be impaired by the state environmental protection agency.

“This area has potential to serve as an environmental training venue for wetlands education, waterfowl habitat and water quality work on polluted streams,” said Ray J. Kane, whose family owns the Rockin’ K Ranch.

Connemara Conservation Director R.J. Taylor explains that we will be able to enhance water quality entering the water way by using restored tributaries and wetlands.

The signing of the easement increases the amount of land protected by  Connemara to more than 6,000 acres as both fee land holdings and under conservation easements. This means that we have more than doubled the amount of land under our protection over the past five years.

The reason for this growth is simple. The explosive rate of development throughout Texas has dramatically increased interest in land conservation. Almost daily we are contacted by landowners, local governments and even forward-thinking developers about ways to protect important remaining parts of our landscape.

We are proud that for more than three decades the Connemara Conservancy has been at the forefront of land conservation and environmental education in North Texas. We look forward to making many more announcements such as this in the near future.

Connemara Conservancy Board President Marcus Yarbrough (left), Conservation Director RJ Taylor (Center) and landowner Ray Kane at the signing of an easement that moved Connemara over the 6,000 acre mark of conserved land in North Texas.

Connemara Conservancy Board President Marcus Yarbrough (left), Conservation Director RJ Taylor (Center) and landowner Ray Kane at the signing of an easement that moved Connemara over the 6,000 acre mark of conserved land in North Texas.

New report highlights alarming loss of land in North Texas

Rooftops2 copySocial investing in land conservation via Connemara is an investment in our region’s economy, drinking water and quality of life for the sake of ourselves and those who will live after us.

The third edition of Texas Land Trends provides information to public and private decision-makers with timely information to support the conservation of Texas working lands. It is published by the Texas A&M Institute of Renewable Natural Resources every five years, following the availability of the USDA NASS Census of Agriculture data.  This year it includes an interactive website that illustrates where Texas is losing land at an alarming rate.

Would you be surprised to hear that every county that borders Tarrant County and Dallas County lost significant amounts of land due to rapid growth?  Frisco ranked 2nd as the city in Texas to lose the most to development.

The bottom line is this:  no land = no food, no quality drinking water, no quality of life in North Texas.  Connemara is here to protect those basic needs of daily survival by working with landowners on smart land use options right here in North Texas.  It’s not a matter of “will development happen.”  It’s a matter of how it’s done.

Visit www.txlandtrends.org to read more about the dramatic loss of land and its impact on all of us.

 

Perot Museum to feature documentary on green burial

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“What if our last act could be a gift to the planet?” That’s the subject of a new documentary on green burial called A Will for the Woods to be featured Nov. 6 at 7 p.m. at the Perot Museum in Dallas. In addition, the Texas Parks and Wildlife will be on hand to discuss conservation burial and their activities with the Green Burial Council.

Amy Martin, a  columnist for DFW GreenSource offers a thoughtful preview of the movie and you can read her commentary by clicking here.

For more details on the screening, click here.

 

 

 

 

The urgent need to keep open spaces open

Openspace

Occasionally we come across an article that is so important and inspiring that we have to share it. Such is David K. Langford’s recent guest blog for the Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation on the critical role that open space plays today and will play in the future in maintaining our water supply.

“We are reaching a point in Texas where simply standing on common ground is not enough. The lives of urban and rural Texans are irreversibly intertwined,” David writes. “Whether our roots are planted in the soil or our foundations are built on concrete, we must come to understand that as the land goes, so goes the water—and life as we know it.”

We urge you to click here to read this important blog today.

 

Site last updated November 23, 2019 @ 9:13 am